ELC477: Power Systems and Renewability

Catalog Information

Course Units: 1.0

Prerequisite: ENG272, ELC251

Corequisite: n/a

 

Course Description

As the energy resources on which our society currently relies (e.g. petroleum, coal) are exhausted, the need for innovation in power and energy system engineering grows. Specifically, engineers must examine methods to increase energy renewability as well as efficiency in energy conversion, distribution, and utilization.  It is appropriate that this course places focus on electric power systems, as electric power is the “medium” with most promise to support new energy technologies.  This course provides students with knowledge of as well as the ability to model and analyze the nonlinear behavior of electric power systems.  Focus is placed on 3-phase power, complex power and power factor, transformer modeling, synchronous machine modeling, transmission line modeling, load flow analysis, economic dispatch, and energy renewability.  Students apply this knowledge to design via laboratory exercises.

 

Primary Textbook

Electric Power Systems: A First Course

Authored by Ned Mohan

Published by Wiley Education

ISBN-13: 978-1118074794
ISBN-10: 1118074793

 

Course Objectives*

Objective #1: Introduce students to the basics of three-phase power systems, transformer and synchronous machine modeling, load flow analysis, and economic dispatch [a, c, e, k].

Objective #2: Introduce students to nonlinear optimization techniques such as the Newton-Raphson Method [a,k].

Objective #3: Provide students with an understanding of emerging technologies related to power such as the photovoltaic cell, wind turbine, hydrogen fuel cells and (what is commonly referred to as) smart grid [c,h,j].

Objective #4: Challenge students – through multiple software and hardware laboratory exercises – to identify, formulate, and solve problems related to the design, analysis, and operation of electric power systems [b,c,e,g,l].

 

Topics Covered

1. Three-Phase AC Power

2. Complex Power and Power Factor

3. Transformer Modeling

4. Synchronous Machine and Generator Modeling

5. Transmission and Distribution Line Modeling

6. High-Voltage DC Transmission (via lab)

7. Load Flow Analysis via Gauss and Newton-Raphson Methods

8. Economic Dispatch via Lagrange and Lambda-Iteration Methods

9. Basics of Photovoltaic Cell, Wind Turbine, and Related Technologies

10. Role of Digital Technology, Distributed Generation, and Demand Response

11. Design and Planning of Power Grids

 

Evaluation / Grading

1. Homework (5%)

2. Design Exercises and Labs (10%)

3. Quizzes (25%)

4. Final Research Project (5%)

5. Midterm (25%) and Final Exam (30%)

 

Performance Criteria**

Objective #1: Students will demonstrate understanding of basics of three-phase power systems, transformer and synchronous machine modeling, load flow analysis, and economic dispatch.

Objective #2: Students will demonstrate ability to employ nonlinear optimization techniques such as the Newton-Raphson Method.

Objective #3: Students will demonstrate understanding of emerging technologies related to power such as the photovoltaic cell, wind turbine, hydrogen fuel cells and (what is commonly referred to as) smart grid.

Objective #4: Students will demonstrate ability to identify, formulate, and solve problems related to the design, analysis, and operation of electric power systems.

 

Contribution

Engineering Science: 0%

Engineering Design: 100%

 

*   Numbers in brackets refer to the educational objectives of the Engineering Department

** Letters in brackets refer to evaluation methods used to assess student performance.